The Sisters Brothers

It’s some time since I saw Jacques Audiard’s previous films, A Prophet and Rust and Bone, but I seem to remember that in both of them we saw how some of the best aspects of human behaviour – generosity, thoughtfulness, idealism – can spring out of harsh and violent surroundings, and take us by surprise; so too, here, in the beautiful landscape of America’s west coast where the greed for gold drives all men. Please click on image to read more ...   

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The Favourite

What a pleasure to watch this dynamic, colourful, stylish, noisy, tragicomic film about three remarkable women, played with élan by Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone; set in the court of Queen Anne, it is a psychological rather than a costume drama, but with utterly splendid costumes nonetheless ... Please click on image to read more ...

Shoplifters

This Palme d’Or winner is a film about loneliness and love in the modern world; it is at once specifically Japanese and yet simultaneously universal. Please click on image to read more ...

The Wife

Early one morning, when novelist Joseph Castleman and his wife Joan are still in bed, the phone rings. It’s Stockholm. Castleman has won the Nobel Prize for Literature. From there it all begins to unravel in this gripping, suspenseful, and at times very funny film. Please click on image to read more ...

Crazy Rich Asians

All four of us enjoyed this archetypal story of young lovers overcoming family disapproval to win through and plight their troth at last; we especially enjoyed the non-archetypal setting of high life – literally at times: the final party is held on the conjoined roofs of a row of skyscrapers – amongst the Singapore super rich. No, not super rich: crazy rich! Please click on the image to read more ...

Apostasy

Siobhan Finneran is outstanding in this gripping, harrowing drama about a family of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Manchester – a woman and her two daughters – who are destroyed by their own community. Please click on image to read more ...

Leave No Trace

Debra Granik’s film about a 13-year-old girl living with her traumatised war vet father in the wild woods of an Oregon national park is as powerful – although less violent – as Winter’s Bone (2010), and as concerned with the daily lives of people who live outside the mainstream. Please click on image to read more ...

The Happy Prince

Rupert Everett writes, directs and stars in this tender, moving biopic about Oscar Wilde’s final years in exile in France and Italy, reduced to penury and shunned – or worse – by the English abroad. Please click on image to read more ...